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Neurons vs. networks, dynamical and functional implications of neuronal diversity

Abstract

A single neuron – as the main building block of the brain – communicates with other neurons in a highly structured manner as to form the brain as an extraordinary functional system. Understanding the structure and the function of the brain relies on understanding the dynamics underlying the generation of neural activity in both network (topology, connectivity etc.) and cellular (cell types, morphology etc.) levels. Due to the limited access to simultaneous recordings of the neural activity in different levels of representation – known as lack of observability in Control Theory – almost all the efforts on understanding how the neural activity is influenced by the dynamics of the underlying networks as well as the function of its diverse single neurons are mainly biased to the type of experimental recordings and their levels of representation (e.g., micro- vs. macro- levels).  Specifically, it is not clear how neuronal diversity shapes the dynamics and function of large networks and in turns how the network activity regimes amplify or attenuate neuronal diversity.
The main objective of this workshop is to discuss the extent to which the neural activity (in a specific region of the brain) can be represented by the dynamics of the underlying network as well as the functions of its individual neurons.

Schedule
(Further speakers and schedule to be announced)