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Cortical representations and processing of visual motion, slow eye movements, and self-motion

Abstract

Visual motion can only be interpreted in a meaningful way by taking into account self-motion in the world and movement of the eyes and the head. Vestibular input or locomotor efference can be used to predict expected visual input due to self-motion so that motion of the environment can be extracted. Slow eye and head movements triggered by gaze stabilization and ocular following have to be taken into account as well in order to arrive at motion estimates that are relevant for action. Consequently, cortical representations of self-motion, slow eye movements, and visual motion often are found in similar areas, an example being the medial superior temporal area in the parietal cortex. However, often self-motion, visual processing, and eye movements are being investigated separately.

Here we bring together researchers with different viewpoints and interests to discuss how to bring together our concepts on processing of visual motion for perception and action. A focus in the workshop will be on experimental primate neurophysiology but with a strong computational approach. Thereby we hope that the workshop will attract audience from the main conference and also raise awareness for the open problems and challenges still present for visual motion processing.

Schedule