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Berlin Brain-Computer Interface

For several years, research groups in Europe and the USA have been working on systems that allow a direct dialog between man and machine. For that purpose, an interface between brain and computer - the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI), has been developed. (2004)

For several years, research groups in Europe and the USA have been working on systems that allow a direct dialog between man and machine. For that purpose, an interface between brain and computer - the Brain-Computer Interface (BCI), has been developed. (2004)

The interface uses the electrical brain activity measured in the electroencephalogram (EEG).Electrodes that are directly attached to the scalp measure electrical brain signals. After amplification, the signals are transferred to a computer that converts the brain signals into technical control signals. The concept of the BCI is based on the fact that the brain’s activity can reflect the mere imagination of a behavior, e.g. the imagination of moving a hand or a foot. The BCI recognizes correlated changes in the electrical currents of the brain and uses them, for example, to choose between two alternatives: while one option is chosen by the imagination of a movement of the left hand, the imagination of a movement of the right hand leads to the selection of the other option. In this way it is possible to control devices that are attached to a computer; even via the internet such communication is feasible.

Within the framework of the Berlin Brain-Computer Interface (BBCI) project, funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), EEG-controlled systems are developed to be used at a computer based workplace, allowing, for example, to move a cursor with brain activity. Furthermore, the project aims at developing medical tools for patients who suffer from amyotrophia or paraplegia.

The investigation of brain waves is conducted jointly by the work group Intelligent Data Analysis under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Klaus-Robert Müller at Fraunhofer FIRST and the work group Neurophysics, Neurology Clinic, at the Campus Benjamin Franklin of the Charité Medical School Berlin, under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Gabriel Curio. In addition, a non-contact EEG sensor system is being developed in cooperation with the Institut für elektrische Meßtechnik at the TU Braunschweig under the leadership of Prof. Dr. Meinhard Schilling.


Contact persons

Link

Prof. Dr. Gabriel Curio

Berlin Brain-Computer Interface

Project leader Charité, Campus Benjamin Franklin der Charité - Charité Medical School Berlin
Hindenburgdamm 30
12200 Berlin
Phone: +49 (0)30/8445-2276

 

Prof. Dr. Klaus-Robert Müller

Project leader Fraunhofer FIRST
Kekuléstr. 7
12489 Berlin
Phone: +49 (0)30/6392-1860